This Week in NATCA/Labor History
Monday, May 16, 2011



THIS WEEK IN NATCA/ATC/AVIATION HISTORY:

May 20, 1927:
Charles Lindbergh piloted the first solo flight across the Atlantic Ocean.

May 17, 1987 — Equipment modernization: The FAA begins using the Aircraft Situation Display at its Central Flow Control Facility in Washington, D.C. The equipment provides a real-time visual display of all aircraft flying IFR in the nation.

May 20, 1991 — Controller benefits: NATCA and the FAA reach agreement on alternative work schedules, which enable controllers to complete an 80-hour work period in less than 10 days.

May 19-22, 2002 — NATCA Lobby Week: The Hyatt Regency on Capitol Hill is slated to serve as the host hotel.


THIS WEEK IN LABOR HISTORY:

1920:
The first labor bank opens in Washington, D.C., launched by officers of the Machinists. The Locomotive Engineers opened a bank in Cleveland later that year.

1938: U.S. Supreme Court issues Mackay decision, which permits the permanent replacement of striking workers. The decision had little impact until Ronald Regan’s replacement of striking air traffic controllers (PATCO) in 1981, a move that signaled antiunion private sector employers that it was OK to do likewise.

1950: Atlanta transit workers, objecting to a new city requirement that they be fingerprinted as part of the employment process, go on strike. They relented and returned to work six months later.